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Conservation Strategists Meet for Plant Protection in China

CHINA
17 March 2008

 

Plant experts meet in China to begin implementing the conservation strategy

 

Following the launch of China's first-ever nationwide plant conservation strategy in early 2007, in late February this year foresters, botanists and arboriculturalists from all over China gathered to discuss the role of botanic gardens in implementing this strategy.

High on the agenda was the carving out of an action plan for the conservation of China's most threatened tree species.

Priorities for Plant Conservation 

Sara Oldfield addresses the workshop on plant conservation  

 Sara Oldfield, Secretary General of BGCI, addresses
the workshop on plant conservation
at the South China Botanic Garden

Opened at the inauguration of BGCI's China office, situated in the lush grounds of the South China Botanical Garden, the workshop considered ways to publicise the Chinese Strategy for Plant Conservation (CSPC). The experts also identified priority projects and funding sources for its implementation over 2008-2010.

The meeting established that a key role botanic gardens could play in the implementation of this strategy was through planning for the integrated conservation of globally endangered trees in China (target 8 of the CSPC).

With this in mind, delegates sought to review gaps in ex situ collections for such species, in particular for critically endangered oaks, maples and magnolias, as well as agreeing species priorities and locations & methodologies for restoration.

Key themes in the discussion centred around the legal and policy framework of ex and in situ conservation, as well as how to capitalise on the lessons learnt in integrated conservation for future conservation initiatives.



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