Botanic Gardens Conservation International
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Working with communities and their traditional knowledge

Plant collections and researchers may interact with Indigenous peoples and local communities when they acquire wild or cultivated plant genetic resources, and may seek to document and investigate traditional knowledge associated with the resources. It is critical that individuals and institutions work respectfully with communities and request their free prior informed consent before conducting activities that affect communities or acquiring material or information over which those communities have rights. The examples here include some of the guidance available to collections and researchers, and some current practices for seeking consent and involvement.



 Examples

 

1. Global Diversity Foundation – Conducting ethical conservation research

2. The Clauses from the Code of Conduct of the Mexican Association of Botanic Gardens

3. Good practices for working with communites, Mexican Association of Botanic Gardens

4. Jardin Botánico “Francisco Javier Clavijero” and its linkage with communities

5. Montreal Botanical Garden - Establishing a research agreement with an Indigenous community