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Cultivate Issue 10: Hot Topics for 2006

Number 10 - February 2006
Sarah Dixon

Hot Topics

Dear Reader

Looking Back, Looking ForwardWelcome to 2006 and many thanks for your responses to the end-of-the-year survey.

The response this time was less enthusiastic than it has been, so to avoid survey fatigue, this month we will give the survey a rest and invite you to take part in the CBD's Virtual Biodiversity Conference instead.

Its on until March, run in six languages and they are looking for ideas on meeting biodiversity targets. It's your chance to let the CBD know how much botanic gardens have to offer in conserving biodiversity.

Best wishes,
Sarah Dixon
cultivate@bgci.org

Hot topics in 2006

Looking ahead to 2006, there are many new challenges facing botanic gardens and even more problems facing plant diversity. In this issue, we take an in-depth look at some of these challenges and how botanic gardens can work together to meet them.

Climate Changes

climate changesClimate change is starting to affect us all - from Chicago to the Ukraine, botanic gardens have already been reporting extreme weather events this year. And we all of course know of the hurricanes that devastated gardens in Florida and Mexico last year, amongst others.

BGCI are taking part in a workshop on climate change and botanic gardens in April and you can expect to see consultation and reporting on this key topic over the coming year. We will be reporting on the responses of botanic gardens to this issue, and we are very grateful to all our members that provided information. In the meantime you can use put your spare computer power (if you have any) to take part in the world's biggest climate change experiment.

Read more about the changing climate for botanic gardens in our 'Hot Topics' assessment of the year ahead.

Human Well-being

Increasingly, the agendas of human welfare campaigners and those of the conservation sector are coming together. The Millennium Development Goals are shaping the agenda in many governments worldwide and it is becoming increasingly important for conservation workers to show the value of their efforts in improving human health, wealth and happiness.

Find out how gardens are using bidiversity to improve human well-being

More Articles

GBIF and Botanic Gardens

GBIFThe Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) is an international non-profit organisation to provide free and universal access to data regarding the world's biodiversity.

It's basically there to provide a huge integrated global database on all life, that everyone can use.

Find out how botanic gardens are contributing

 

New Look Website for BGCI

BGCI New websiteBGCI is updating it's website - after March 8th you can expect to see a new look as well as several new features and - we hope - improved usability. Your input in our user survey gave us lots of ideas, and we are doing our best to incorporate as many as possible. Let us know what you think, and ask for help and give ideas whenever you want to.

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Cultivate E-Bulletin
Cultivate, BGCI's regular e-bulletin brings you opinion, comment, case studies and surveys for and about the world's botanic gardens. Sign up today - click the link.
Taxonomy and Plant Conservation
BGCI's Etelka Leadlay tells how good taxonomy is essential to successful plant conservation. This book is a key guide to anyone working in this field.